If a laptop is stolen or lost, and the data is not backed up, you just lost it all. Worst of all, even if you had it locked with a strong password, it’s very likely to get cracked. Once the thief succeeds, any private data that is unencrypted is free for the taking. One solution: keep sensitive and important data, files, pictures, contracts, etc., on a secure private cloud service, so it’s never on your employer’s hard drive in the first place. By storing this information in the cloud, you can immediately revoke access when a device goes missing. Side Tip: If you have important family photos, store it in Shutterfly or some other photo-storing cloud application so those are backed up as well.

Cybercrime is at an all-time high, and hackers are setting their sights on small and medium businesses who are “low hanging fruit.” Don’t be their next victim! Click here to download this free report that reveals the most common ways that hackers get in and how to protect yourself today.

You know you’re guilty of it: using the same password for everything. Believe me, I understand how annoying it is to try and remember all those passwords; and if you’re using the same password for sites that don’t share sensitive information, like a login to a news feed you like to read, then it’s generally okay.

HOWEVER, the ONE password you want to keep unique is your e-mail password.

If an e-commerce site you’ve registered at or bought from gets hacked – and you’ve used the SAME password you usually use for everything to register at the site – you can pretty much bet hackers are going to gain access to your in-box.

They’ll have your e-mail and your password to the e-commerce site and will use that to hack in. From there, they’ll have fertile ground for getting all your data and other passwords.

Cybercrime is at an all-time high, and hackers are setting their sights on small and medium businesses who are “low hanging fruit.” Don’t be their next victim! Click here to download this free report that reveals the most common ways that hackers get in and how to protect yourself today.

Here’s a tip that just might save your bacon: Set up withdrawal alerts on your bank accounts. Many banks will send you an e-mail alert whenever money is withdrawn from your account via check, debit card or transfer. Setting up those alerts will allow you to spot and report fraudulent activity BEFORE the money has already been siphoned into a cybercriminal’s hands.

Second tip: Require dual-factor authentication to access your bank account. Most banks will have this as a security setting for your account.

That simply means when you try to log in, you will be asked to enter a four or five-digit code sent to your mobile phone or personal e-mail. This will prevent a hacker from getting in EVEN IF they crack your password.

Cybercrime is at an all-time high, and hackers are setting their sights on small and medium businesses who are “low hanging fruit.” Don’t be their next victim! Click here to download this free report that reveals the most common ways that hackers get in and how to protect yourself today.